Where am I. Who are you people. What's going on. What time is it. Why does everything taste like the sound of yellow.

 

ingthing:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

appleseeddrama:

THEY HAVE THE ACE ATTORNEY OFFICIAL MANGA IN MY LAW LIBRARY I AM CRYING.



Your honor, something is amiss here!
As you are probably aware, library materials are labeled with barcodes as well as a number to determine their location on the shelf, as per the Dewey Decimal System. The books just to the left of the manga are labeled, as are the DVDs just in view on the lower shelf. Look even further behind these shelves and you’ll see that even those books are labeled! 
Ladies and gentlemen of the courtroom, I invite you to take a closer look at the volumes that are, allegedly, part of this law library! Something is missing from the spines, isn’t there?

Where are the bar codes?!
This is a blatant contradiction! The OP is lying— these volumes cannot, therefore, be a part of this library at all! I propose that they simply brought these materials in for the sake of the joke!! 


Only focusing on one aspect and not the whole of the issue, are we, Mr. Wright? Typical.

Your honor, if you bring your attention to the books just left of the manga, you’ll notice there’s a book (the second to the left) that also does not have a bar code.

If you examine the picture even closer—particularly the DVDs below—you’ll see that they bear bar codes, but not on the spines. No, they have them on the back and/or front of the DVDs. Of course, this method of labeling and organizing isn’t limited to products of the film industry alone.

Therefore, I’d like to propose that it is entirely possible that the manga books do, in fact, belong to the library!


Wh-WHAAAAT?! You’re kidding!! 
(Shoot, he’s got me there… Better think of something fast! Something about the books that sets them apart from—
…! I’ve got it!)
While that may be true, you’ve also overlooked one critical error: the titles of the books! Whether or not your hypothesis regarding the labeling system is correct, these titles aren’t alphabetized correctly! What kind of self-respecting librarian would misplace such vital books? 
Well, Edgeworth?



While it pains me to have to point out something so obvious, I suppose I’ll make an exception for you, Wright.
Clearly, one look at the titles of the books next to the manga is a tell-all of this certain library’s less-than-stellar organization skills. None of the books are in alphabetical order, I’m afraid.

They could very well be alphabetized by author and not title, but it’s a little difficult to be able to decipher that from this single picture, wouldn’t you say?
Furthermore, the manga books themselves are in numerical order, suggesting some kind of system is in place, albeit not a very good one, if the alphabetizing is off.

At the end of the day, it seems like neither of us can draw a clear conclusion from this evidence alone. Your honor, I strongly suggest a recess in which we could investigate the library itself further.

I see the issue here very clearly.
Due to the uncertain nature of this case, we’ll have to postpone this decision until more decisive evidence can be obtained. The court will now take a 15-minute recess.

(W-wait, but I’m not—)


WAIT!!!

I’ve got some decisive evidence for you, pal!

We investigated further into the photo. Zooming in, you can see a label on the DVD case to the bottom left.

Photo Close-up added to the court record!


As you can see, pal, you can vaguely see the words “Of Toledo Law Library” on the label!

And, considering possibilities of the rest of that label, “University of Toledo" was the first to come to my mind!
A quick search on the University of Toledo’s Online Law Library Database revealed that there ARE the comics pictured in it!
Miles Edgeworth Ace Attorney Investigations volumes 1-4 and Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney volumes 1-5!

And there’s more! 
The section these comics are filed under is the “Law in Popular Culture" Section, which matches up with the stickers on the rest of the books on that shelf: "Lowering the Bar: Lawyer Jokes & Legal Culture”, “Prime Time Law”, “Lawyers in Your Living Room!" and "Reel Justice: The Courtroom Goes to the Movies”!
Not only is it in the right section, it’s also a documented part of the Law Library’s database!
How’s that for decisive evidence?

ingthing:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

appleseeddrama:

THEY HAVE THE ACE ATTORNEY OFFICIAL MANGA IN MY LAW LIBRARY I AM CRYING.

image

image

Your honor, something is amiss here!

As you are probably aware, library materials are labeled with barcodes as well as a number to determine their location on the shelf, as per the Dewey Decimal System. The books just to the left of the manga are labeled, as are the DVDs just in view on the lower shelf. Look even further behind these shelves and you’ll see that even those books are labeled! 

Ladies and gentlemen of the courtroom, I invite you to take a closer look at the volumes that are, allegedly, part of this law library! Something is missing from the spines, isn’t there?

image

Where are the bar codes?!

This is a blatant contradiction! The OP is lying— these volumes cannot, therefore, be a part of this library at all! I propose that they simply brought these materials in for the sake of the joke!! 

Only focusing on one aspect and not the whole of the issue, are we, Mr. Wright? Typical.

Your honor, if you bring your attention to the books just left of the manga, you’ll notice there’s a book (the second to the left) that also does not have a bar code.

If you examine the picture even closer—particularly the DVDs below—you’ll see that they bear bar codes, but not on the spines. No, they have them on the back and/or front of the DVDs. Of course, this method of labeling and organizing isn’t limited to products of the film industry alone.

Therefore, I’d like to propose that it is entirely possible that the manga books do, in fact, belong to the library!

image

Wh-WHAAAAT?! You’re kidding!! 

image
(Shoot, he’s got me there… Better think of something fast! Something about the books that sets them apart from—

image
…! I’ve got it!)

While that may be true, you’ve also overlooked one critical error: the titles of the books! Whether or not your hypothesis regarding the labeling system is correct, these titles aren’t alphabetized correctly! What kind of self-respecting librarian would misplace such vital books? 

Well, Edgeworth?

While it pains me to have to point out something so obvious, I suppose I’ll make an exception for you, Wright.

Clearly, one look at the titles of the books next to the manga is a tell-all of this certain library’s less-than-stellar organization skills. None of the books are in alphabetical order, I’m afraid.

They could very well be alphabetized by author and not title, but it’s a little difficult to be able to decipher that from this single picture, wouldn’t you say?

Furthermore, the manga books themselves are in numerical order, suggesting some kind of system is in place, albeit not a very good one, if the alphabetizing is off.

At the end of the day, it seems like neither of us can draw a clear conclusion from this evidence alone. Your honor, I strongly suggest a recess in which we could investigate the library itself further.

I see the issue here very clearly.

image
Due to the uncertain nature of this case, we’ll have to postpone this decision until more decisive evidence can be obtained. The court will now take a 15-minute recess.

image

(W-wait, but I’m not—)

image

WAIT!!!

I’ve got some decisive evidence for you, pal!

We investigated further into the photo. Zooming in, you can see a label on the DVD case to the bottom left.

Photo Close-up added to the court record!

As you can see, pal, you can vaguely see the words “Of Toledo Law Library” on the label!

And, considering possibilities of the rest of that label, “University of Toledo" was the first to come to my mind!

A quick search on the University of Toledo’s Online Law Library Database revealed that there ARE the comics pictured in it!

Miles Edgeworth Ace Attorney Investigations volumes 1-4 and Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney volumes 1-5!

And there’s more! 

The section these comics are filed under is the “Law in Popular Culture" Section, which matches up with the stickers on the rest of the books on that shelf: "Lowering the Bar: Lawyer Jokes & Legal Culture”, “Prime Time Law”, “Lawyers in Your Living Room!" and "Reel Justice: The Courtroom Goes to the Movies”!

Not only is it in the right section, it’s also a documented part of the Law Library’s database!

How’s that for decisive evidence?

miss-jaxon-flaxon-waxon:

onwardwall:

thegingerbalrog:

my-fandom-life:

dismantlerepaired:

whereismystrawberrytart:

hikingnerd:

timelordpillbug:

follovved:

amerlcanapparel:

when she says she doesn’t send nudes

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when guys objectify women and expect them to send nudesimage

when someone asks you about your nuclear plans for russia

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When Russia sends you nudes

image

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image

image

image

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Randomized Mass Effect 2 Part 6: Assist Kasumi

Okay so apparently all it took for me to become good at this game again was to get the SMG shield penetrate upgrade. Hopefully this means updates will be coming faster now.

  • I am beginning to suspect that, in addition to completely changing his appearance, Cerberus caused Jfu serious brain damage when they resurrected him. I keep getting the weirdest strings of die rolls, making him repeat the same question over and over. I always imagine the crew slowly repeating what they just said to him in the hopes that this time it’ll stick.
  • Watching Jfu 2 try to blend in at a party and be subtle was hilarious. When trying to get a voice print from Hock, Jfu 2 managed to insult both Hock and the rest of the party guests. I was actually a little disappointed that my complete failure in conversation didn’t have any actual effect on the mission.
  • Instead of the animations bugging out, this mission the audio decided to go crazy. For some reason, the death cry for enemy female engineers wouldn’t turn off until every other enemy was dead as well. Which meant I was spending a lot of the fights in this mission listening to unending screams of horrible agony. Fun stuff.
  • After breaking into a man’s house, killing him and his guards, destroying valuable works of art, and committing several acts of theft along the way, Jfu 2 convinced Kasumi not to destroy the data on the greybox from Keiji. Because spending your days drowning in recordings of memories is totally a good way to cope with stuff.
mymusicmydrugmylife asked
What makes you think that stealing someone else's art is okay? Not to even start with the message you tacked onto it. Someone worked so hard on that and you took it and bastardized it. You should be ashamed of yourself.

piedrabbit:

flikkerlicht:

I want you to step back and learn what the phrase ‘all rights reserved’ means.

Under current US copyright laws, any creative work is automatically protected from the moment it is first published, performed, or produced. This means the creator of the work must be recognized as the legal owner when it comes to fair use of that work by others. Essentially, the writer of a novel or the sculptor of a statue holds all of the legal rights to that work unless or until he or she decides to grant some of those rights to others. One common way to establish these rights is to include the phrase all rights reserved somewhere on the work itself. It is quite common for movie producers to include the phrase as part of the film’s closing credits, for example, and publishers may also include it on one of the front pages of a novel. The phrase serves to remind others that the original creator of the work still owns every right to the material.

Legally, I am not even obligated to put that phrase on my blog, if the artist creates something, and there is no further notice on copyright, automatically, all rights are reserved.

The phrase all rights reserved does not have to appear at all on a published work in order for the creator to receive copyright protection. Many artists and producers use it as more of a warning to those who may be considering unauthorized use of that material or creation. By pointing out that all rights are still held or reserved by the original creator, the phrase establishes awareness of the current copyright laws and an implied willingness to pursue legal action if those rights are violated.

So what doe the rights in ‘all right reserved’ include?

image

Without my direct permission, no one has the right to edit, reproduce, sell, use or create derivative work except me.

So what does derivative work mean?

A derivative work is a new, original product that includes aspects of a preexisting, already copyrighted work. Also known as a “new version,” derivative works can include musical arrangements, motion pictures, art reproductions, sound recordings or translations. They can also include dramatizations and fictionalizations, such as a movie based on a play.

You drew the exact same character as me, it contains aspects of preexisting work, and thus, this is a derivative work. Derivative work include parodies. This is also a parody created from derivative work. Only Marchel Duchamp had all the rights to make the parody because the Mona Lisa is public domain.

However, a copyright owner can grant permission to someone else to make a derivative work based on his or her original—if permission is granted (in the form of a license or assignment), then creation of the derivative work is not infringement. But if the original isn’t yours and you don’t get permission to use the original from its creator, then you’re infringing that author’s copyright.

I have not given you a license or permission to create derivative work. You are in fact infringing copyright. I explicitally pointed out not to USE or EDIT my artwork, but it still says all rights are reserved. If you didn’t know what ‘using’ my artwork entails you shoul’ve sent me an message.

I did not grant you to do this without permission. And since my artwork is commercial, you also do not have the right to sell your derivative work (which I know you were considering.)

I ask you to delete your work, because like stating above, it’s infringing copyright.

Sources: x x x x

Should every fanartist and fanfic writer be prosecuted for copyright infringement as well, then?

Because according to what you’ve written and sourced, well, that seems to be the case.

And if no, then you should let go of this one case.

You cannot argue the illegality of only an isolated incident. The law either applies everywhere identically, or nowhere at all.

Technically, according to US copyright law, all fanart and fanfic is illegal. It gets by without legal issue by being so unimportant that it isn’t worth the owner’s time/money to go through all the legal hoops to bring it down. But if the owner of the original work ever wanted to, they could bring charges against everyone who has made fanart/fanfic about their work. Though I haven’t heard of any going that far; usually they just request that fanfic websites don’t host anything based off their stories (Anne Rice being an example of an author who has done so.)

As for the original issue of parody, well, that’s where stuff gets complicated. The part of the law dealing with fair use in copyright, and therefore parody, is thus:

brozoi:

are u familiar with the concept of parody

"Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright. In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include —

(1) the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes;

(2) the nature of the copyrighted work;

(3) the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and

(4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.

The fact that a work is unpublished shall not itself bar a finding of fair use if such finding is made upon consideration of all the above factors.”

Whether or not a parody falls under criticism or comment is going to be under a lot of varying interpretation, and I’m not going to make any comment on this specific case. Just throwing out that copyright is not an ironclad set of rules; there are exceptions, and those exceptions can get real wonky and confusing at times.

thekusabi:

There is a life-sized Goddess Madoka and I must make a pilgrimage to her before I die